How to Gain Respect at Your Workplace

how-to-gain-respect-at-your-workplace

Table of Contents

How to gain respect at work?

You are your own worst adversary. At work, we don’t take you seriously because you don’t give us many reasons to. You can only get the respect you deserve if you start acting like it. The good news is that you have control over it and can effect positive change.

Look at your appearance and how you are dressed

What? You don’t want to be right if dressing in a way that expresses your individuality is wrong? If you want us to take you seriously, you must first appear to be someone we can take seriously. Hey, if we’re so shallow, what do you care what we think?

One creatively dressed rebel turned button-down manager discovered firsthand that clothes do indeed make the worker. “A dress code is (not just) about restricting my expression – it’s also a code to other people how they should respond to me,” wrote Wayne Turmel. Thank you for treating me as a professional.”

And don’t expect to be treated as a professional if your attire accentuates your physical features. The more you reveal about yourself, the less we will see of your professional abilities.

So, look around the office. Who gets the admiration you seek? Don’t follow them around until they show you their version of retail heaven. But take note of the basic style. Try on an outfit and see where it takes you.

Don’t be afraid to shop on the cheap or secondhand. You want something clean, not something fancy. Goodwill and Target may have what you’re looking for. Don’t blow your budget if you have to stifle your creativity.

You’re amusing, Perhaps a little too much

Everyone enjoys your sense of humor. This includes me. Who wants to work with someone who can’t laugh at themselves? It’s reassuring to know you’re always prepared with a quip to brighten someone’s day.

It’s also beneficial to the company. In the workplace, Steven Sultanoff makes a compelling case for it. Humor can improve communication and relationships while also decreasing stress and absenteeism. So, what’s the issue?

First and foremost, not everyone finds you amusing. Humor is extremely subjective. And someone believes that your cracks are inappropriate. They don’t want to say anything because everyone else is laughing. If you go too far, they may object over your head rather than telling you directly. You won’t realize it until you have a “hostile environment” discussion with HR.

Second, even if you don’t offend anyone, your jokes don’t make us want to take you seriously. Maybe you’re making jokes because you don’t know what else to say. Do people think of your hard work or intelligence when they think of you? Or do they recall that great one-liner you delivered during the budget meeting?

In terms of levity, That self-deprecation has to go

Making fun of yourself is a good way to make us laugh without offending anyone. Your stupidity, incompetence, and ignorance are amusing. It’s also enjoyable to collaborate with someone who doesn’t take themselves too seriously.

But why should we if you don’t?

You’re joking, of course. And everyone is aware of this. However, every joke about you reinforces a negative image of you in our subconscious.

Honestly. I know. I come from a long line of astute individuals. And it’s not difficult for me to brighten a room with a one-liner. But I have to keep it under control. I need to make sure they hear useful, thoughtful statements from me as well. This is not tedious. Offering wisdom can make you interesting in a completely new way.

And I’m aware that humor is an excellent way to flirt. Someone who can make me laugh is very appealing to me. But please, no more treating our office like a singles bar.

Don’t think you can get away with playing the field just because you’re a guy. I am aware that women face a double standard. Their sexual activities can make them appear as sluts, whereas men are regarded as studs. It’s not right. But you don’t get off lightly.

Someone slapping you on the back and calling you Romeo in the men’s room does not imply you have professional respect. We’re wondering if you’re more concerned with getting the job done or getting the new temp out the door.

The ladies are unimpressed. And I’m not referring to those in positions of authority here. By the way, there are more of them than there were previously. However, the person in the next cubicle is not pleased with your exploits. She wonders if you’re trying to hit on her when you turn to face her.

This is a big topic that deserves more attention later. Keep an eye out.

You must give a little to receive a little

How much respect do you show the people you want to be respected by? I know. Why should you bother if we don’t respect you? You are correct. We actually agree with you.

So you’ll have to swallow your pride and stop whining, “He hit me first!” Start showing some respect and see what happens.

And then there’s the TMI

I understand that we live in the information age. However, you are providing far too much of it. To be honest, I already know more about you than I care to. It’s nice to be able to share with coworkers. It brings us closer together and aids in our bonding. But do I really need to know where your spouse’s new mole is? Or that you and your partner had your tenth argument this week? Also, please keep your personal hygiene habits to yourself.

We need to talk about work a little more. When you’re talking about your personal life so much, it doesn’t seem like you spend much time working.

Okay, you made some errors.

I’m talking about genuine blunders. We made mistakes that cost us money. And people around here are wary of trusting you.

I’m not sure what your deal is. But you must first master it. Determine why you’re doing this. Purchase a self-help book. See a therapist. Look at Dr. Phil. Whatever. Simply take the time to understand what circumstances led to your mistakes. Then do everything you can to change those circumstances.

And don’t point the finger at anyone else. Nobody believes that. So start taking ownership of what you’re doing. The less you say “It’s not my fault,” the more likely we are to believe it when it is true.

We need to see that you regret your mistakes, accept responsibility for them, and work to avoid them in the future.

You have a difficult reputation to overcome. It will require a lot of effort.

Listen. Everything is under your control. You can take charge of how others perceive you and ensure that it is positive. You can quickly notice a significant shift in their attitudes.

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